“Tupperware for Glass” new single by HEllo Emerson

“Tupperware for Glass” is the first single of the upcoming album “To Keep Him Here” by Hello Emerson.

Now you can preorder the new album as limited vinyl or cd in our shop.

“Thanks for listening to our new single Tupperware for Glass (tiny desk video) — it’s the opening salvo for our third album, due out in a matter of weeks. I’m more proud of it than anything I’ve made (ever) and I’m so thrilled to share it with you.”

“If you listened to it, you probably noticed it starts with a man’s voice. That’s my father, recounting his last memories before a serious and sudden accident wiped his memory and landed him in the hospital for nine days. At the end of the story, he’s alive and well (though with less of a filter and no sense of smell). But at the time, I was certain that I would never speak to him again. During those nine days, the family walked the balance beam between pulling for his recovery and steeling ourselves to say goodbye. It was difficult — and it require some unpacking.”

“For me, unpacking all of that meant making a record from it.His voice carries us through the entire 40 minutes, with additional chamber instrumentation from Knisely. I am so excited to share it with you — and I believe that it can provide some comfort and solace to people who have also sit in hospital rooms with loved ones, without much productive to do but hope.”

Cheers,

Sam & Hello Emerson

John Blek

Original folk songwriter based in Cork, Ireland. Delving into the world of fingerstyle guitar, influenced by the music of Ireland, England and America.

“I spent much of the early part of 2017 in and out of hospital with some mysterious illness that was intent on wasting my now 30-year-old body. My energy was at an all time low and all that gave me joy had been stripped or put on hold. All but my guitar and what was left of my feeble voice. So to fill the days and occupy my mind, I wrote.

I wrote of resilience, of pain and uncertainty. Of new love through fevered dreams, of strength, hope, distance, sedation and the cure.

I did it every day and recorded the demos sitting up in my hospital bed accompanied by the electronic bleeps of the machines and punctuated by the nurse’s concerned enquiries.

I had a reason. For me this is cathartic. For me, this was the panacea.”

John Blek

Hometown Caravan Shop

In an age when it would be easy to become disillusioned with the music industry John has remained steadfastly positive and unyieldingly creative. Known for being one of Ireland’s hardest touring musicians. His live show is thoughtful and entertaining, littered with stories and showcasing his arresting vocals and intricate guitar playing.

……………..

“A lovely sounding thing” – Roddy Hart, BBC

“A force of nature” – The Irish Times

“a master of subtlety in realms of folk-informed pop.” – The Thin Air

‘His songwriter talent is shining brighter with every album.’ – John Creedon, RTÉ

Digger Barnes

Digger Barnes is a musician, based in Hamburg, Germany. He has performed extensively in Europe and the US and collaborated with various artists of the Americana genre. Being a songwriter, recording artist and touring musician for more than 20 years, he currently works as a composer for stages and screens. For more information, please visit: portdelaselva.org

Info:

An abandoned theme park, by the side of the road two old dinosaurs made of fiberglass. A car passes, followed by a cloud of dust. At the wheel a mustached man, on the backseat a guitar case.

Over the past 10 years, singer-songwriter Digger Barnes has been documenting his life on the road and capturing it on record. Tales of longing, melancholy and morbid charm are his trademark and the material of the “Diamond Road Show“. The “Diamond Road Show“ is a peculiar type of road movie – a bastard bearing the DNA of cinema and concert alike.

Digger Barnes developed this show-format alongside his friend, painter and video-artist Pencil Quincy. In previous years many miles were traveled to bring the “Diamond Road Show” to people at home and abroad. Yet here too, the outsider breaks with the norm: Instead of bringing the film show solely to clubs or cinemas, the tour, not unlike the road itself treads unfamiliar territory. Barnes takes his road trip to cemeteries, chapels, old gas stations, boxcars, squats and doesn’t even shy away from psychiatric institutions, high-brow theaters or airplane hangars. Being constantly on the road, Digger Barnes’ life and the fictional episodes of the “Diamond Road Show” merge and become inseparable.

Discography:


“Near Exit 27“ (2017, B&Q)
“Frame By Frame“ (2014, Hometown Caravan, B&Q)
“Every Story True“ (2012, Hometown Caravan, B&Q)
“Time Has Come“ (2009, Hometown Caravan, B&Q)
“Digger & Allie“ (2007, Sabotage)
“My Name Is Digger“ (2007, Sabotage)
“The Trailer Tapes“ (2006, Self-released)

Hometown Caravan Shop

The Gentle Lurch

The Gentle Lurch “We are passing our days / Like two snails / Slowly crawling past each other / A shared office, alright / But aren’t we supposed to be brothers?” . Workingman’s Lurch, just as the title track suggests, is a pessimistic album that deals with work. Going to work, being at work, stagnation, approximating death.

It’s the third album by a band from Dresden, Germany, called The Gentle Lurch. Its members hail from the rural Ore Mountain region nearby. They like to pause in between albums until each and everyone has forgotten about their existence. Their last (double-) album stems from 2009 and Americana-UK spoke of “Dresden‘s Answer to Wilco – a sprawling, experimental epic…” with regards to it back then. Rolling Stone Germany compared them to Lambchop and Tindersticks. 

Since then, the three core members and singers Cornelia Mothes on piano, Frank Heim and Lars Hiller on various string instruments were joined by Ronny Wunderwald on drums and Timo Lippold on bass. Possibly as a consequence, the band has been overheard speaking of Workingman’s Lurch as an “honest-to-God rock record” which, most likely, is an indication of their skewed self-perception. It’s the opposite of a perfectly rounded offering. Each song has got its own will, develops its own strategy and momentum. Ludwig Bauer has written two harrowingly beautiful string arrangements and, from time to time, an obscure ‘Choir of Mothers’ expands the polyphony of voices of the band’s three lead singers.

Yet, drums and bass provide a much firmer framework for this new set of songs. They let them become more concise and, at times, louder than on previous albums. ‘Our Bodies Become The Ground‘ rolls like scree avalange from the speakers. Also, Cornelia Mothes takes up much more room on this record, confronting Lars Hiller’s stoic sing-song manner of recitation with a comforting, almost redemptive element. She also brings a previously unfound directness and pop-affinity to this record. Therebeside, plenty of remnants of the old Gentle Lurch remain: close to standstill, precariously groping, a sound like rotten wood.

Their songs are lyric-heavy and narrative. The lyrics like to twist and turn to mystery like the closing observation of a short story by Flannery O’Connor. It’s difficult to call them a folk band, but it’s also difficult to call their output experimental music. There are only three choruses on the whole album. Most tracks are like journeys from point A to point B, others level and rise like waves on an ocean. They use elements of Folk, Country and Americana, because they like their emotional directness. But they realign them into something different. At times, as confrontational as on ‘All Things Come’ which tilts from complaint over into consolation on a single organ note, changing singers as well as harmonies mid-song. There is the strangely rotating chord progression that propels ‘Cannot’, or the groove torpedoing the gospel of ‘On How To Tamp Leaks‘.

Workingman’s Lurch also marks the first time, the band has worked with an external producer. Johannes Gerstengarbe usually stands for a more polished, radio-friendly production style. It was a conscious decision to combine the band’s crude approach with his aesthetics. Mastering was done at Soundcurrent in Knoxville, Tennessee.

The almost two years of recording took place in an abandoned, former chocolate factory surrounded by old GDR-housing projects depicted in the albums artwork and which – apart from a few early 90ies satellite dishes – appear to have gone untouched by the German unity and the Quarter century that has passed.  

Then of course, the album’s title is also a distant echo to Workingman’s Dead by Grateful Dead (1970). Whereas that record could be viewed as a swansong of the innocence and cultural liberation of the 1960ies, Workingsman’s Lurch is the swansong of an unaffected,  self-sufficient life. It doesn’t describe a cultural phenomenon but a biographical one: integration into employment, the groan of material, the deadlock, the grind and creak, the repulsion of nonfunctional parts. „There was something that sat on my heart like a moth.” (Nesting)

buy Workingmans Lurch